The WIP-what happens next

excerpt: So accustomed to her husband who discussed everything with her, now she must think on her own; not pretty because Larry did all the heavy and even the small thinking for both of them.

First she had to feed the sad pooches, both Therapy Dogs, her babies since daughter Shari had long gone and oh, great idea! she could be way more active in their fine organization since both dogs were certified, she might be part of the West Point program, children’s reading program and so much more.

 

She drank a cup of coffee, a smile on her face watching Lulu and Lizzie finish breakfast and leashed them for a brisk walk around the quiet neighborhood. She recalled when Larry first didn’t feel too well, the dogs stayed on the couch with him all the time. How they loved their master: all too soon, it ended.  Yes, she decided, the therapy dog group must be an important part of her life. Joan dressed as best she could considering she felt like, well, like a rag doll today.

Nerves took hold of Joan as she entered the salon: hugs and solicitations from several women she didn’t know made her feel uneasy. After all, they had husbands to talk to, to make love and share a life while she had emptiness. Dale did her best with a trim, roots colored just right and a blow-out complete with curls and advice like keep smiling and time will pass. Inside herself, Joan cringed, paid and left the busy salon. No invitation for dinner, a movie, nothing and she had to make her own life from now on.

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My costume from an Off Broadway showAct 1

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38 thoughts on “The WIP-what happens next

  1. Poor Joan! She seems to be trying to keep herself busy so the grief will not catch up with her. A very emotional snippet! 🙂

  2. Poor Joan. At least she’s not staying shut inside the house and is conscious that she must move on. I love the picture of you in your, ear, skimpy, costume. LOL How comfortable was it to move around in that?

  3. This snippet highlights a major problem for widows: the lack of being included in other people’s plans as Joan notes the lack of invitations. People may not want to intrude on a woman’s grief, not realizing they want that intrusion. Nice snippet!

  4. When my first love died, the group of friends we were so close to for at least twenty years, turned their backs and excluded me from every thing. What a shock . I had to make my own way. When my closest guy friend passed, his wife wanted me to read a eulogy she wrote. of course I did in honor of a man who was like a brother. Widows are not always welcome.

  5. It is strange how people close ranks when you lose your ‘couple’ status. I imagine people do not know what to do with single women🙈 very touching piece, Charmaine.
    I know I would not have managed a costume like yours at all well.

  6. I admire Joan for going out, getting her hair done (that always lifts my spirits) even though she had nowhere special to go. She could have stayed home with the dogs. Making plans to use her therapy dogs is another sign she’d trying to find her place in the world without her spouse. This is very touching, filled with emotion. The towel must have been a challenge.

  7. Oh, this hit home. I think a lot of people don’t know what to do when faced with grief, so they do nothing. When I lost my husband, those friends who went out of their way to include me in everything really meant the world.

  8. A true slice of life all right. I don’t often dwell on details of my widowhood (many years ago) BUT you definitely ‘get the details right’ my friend. I also admire the way your heroine does make plans and faces reality. Terrific! Hugs to you!!! (Sorry to be so late getting here, was sidelined with a migraine today.)

  9. Very touching snippet – I’ve been there myself too, and although it’s something of a cliche, it is at times that you realise who your real, true friends are. They are the ones who find a way to comfort and support, however hard it is for them, the others don’t know how to react, so do nothing and eventually drift away! Also, it was my animals that kept me going, they had to be fed and cared for, so I can relate to how she felt about her dogs too.

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